Thursday, January 17, 2013

Journal Alert: Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 26(1), 2013

Journal Name:   JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES (ISSN: 1360-2322)
Issue:          Vol. 26 No. 1, 2013
IDS#:           058RF
Alert Expires:  10 JAN 2014
Number of Articles in Issue:  8 (8 included in this e-mail)
Organization ID:  c4f3d919329a46768459d3e35b8102e6
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*Pages: 1-2 (Editorial Material)
*View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000312650600001
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Title:
Mental Health and Challenging Behaviour

Authors:
Beail, N

Source:
*JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES*, 26 (1):1-2; SI JAN 2013 

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*Pages: 3-13 (Article)
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Title:
Mental Health Services for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities - What Do Service Users and Staff Think of Them?

Authors:
Kroese, BS; Rose, J; Heer, K; O'Brien, A

Source:
*JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES*, 26 (1):3-13; SI JAN 2013 

Abstract:
Aim The current qualitative study was funded by the Judith Trust to
investigate service users', support staff and community team members'
views of the services currently provided to adults with intellectual
disabilities and mental health problems and what they consider to be
desirable qualities for staff to possess. Method In the first stage of
the study, two focus groups were conducted with service users who have
intellectual disabilities and mental health problems in addition to two
focus groups with a variety of staff, all of who had recent experience
of intellectual disabilities services. In the second stage, individual
interviews were conducted with staff members employed in residential and
community intellectual disabilities services. The number of participants
totalled 54 (16 service users and 38 staff). A qualitative analysis
(IPA) was adopted to identify dominant themes in the discourse of these
stakeholder groups. Results The analysis produced a number of themes
that include: being interested, communication, competence-promoting
support, past/present/future links, prevention, reviews and liaison,
working with carers, looking after staff, staff training/supervision and
interface between services. Conclusion A number of suggestions for
improving services are identified and discussed in the context of
current service policies and procedures.

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*Pages: 14-25 (Article)
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Title:
Treat me Right, Treat me Equal: Using National Policy and Legislation to Create Positive Changes in Local Health Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities

Authors:
Roberts, A; Townsend, S; Morris, J; Rushbrooke, E; Greenhill, B;
Whitehead, R; Matthews, T; Golding, L

Source:
*JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES*, 26 (1):14-25; SI JAN 2013 

Abstract:
Background Creative use of legislation can produce positive change in
the lives of people with intellectual disabilities. This may be
bottom-up or top-down or at multiple levels and with multiple
stakeholders. Method Using a human rightsbased approach (HRBA), four
initiatives to improve services for people with intellectual
disabilities in the UK are described. Results The first example explains
the process of co-producing a DVD and board game to enable people with
intellectual disabilities to understand their human rights. The second
example considers the impact of organizational culture in the process of
embedding a pilot evaluation of practical, human rightsbased risk
assessment and management tools. A third pilot project examines how the
guiding principles of Mental Health Act (MHA) (2007) for England and
Wales can be operationalized using an HRBA. Finally, improving equitable
access to health care through a top-down process of change involving the
Green Light Toolkit is reported. Conclusion The authors consider how to
approach the process and where to focus in the system, to realize
meaningful change.

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*Pages: 26-33 (Article)
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Title:
What Things Make People with a Learning Disability Happy and Satisfied with Their Lives: An Inclusive Research Project

Authors:
Haigh, A; Lee, D; Shaw, C; Hawthorne, M; Chamberlain, S; Newman, DW;
Clarke, Z; Beail, N

Source:
*JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES*, 26 (1):26-33; SI JAN 2013 

Abstract:
Background We looked at the research that other people have done about
what makes people with a learning disability happy and satisfied with
their lives. Researchers call being happy and satisfied with your life
subjective well-being. They found out that having things like money and
good health does not always mean people are happy. They also found that
some people are really happy, even if there are things in their lives
they would like to change. None of the people who have done research
about subjective well-being have interviewed people with a learning
disability about what makes them happy with their lives. Materials and
Methods We have carried out a study about what makes people with a
learning disability happy and satisfied with their lives. This report
talks about the research that we did, and what we found out. We
interviewed 20 people with a learning disability who said they were very
happy and satisfied. We asked them about what things helped them feel
like this. Results The people we spoke to said things like
relationships, choice and independence, activities and valuable social
roles made them feel satisfied with their lives. They told us about the
things that enable them to lead happy lives, and the things that disable
them. We also found out about the importance of personal
characteristics. These are things like looking on the bright side of
life or having ways to manage difficult emotions like sadness or anger.
Conclusions We found out that it is important for people with a learning
disability to have good things in their lives, but it is also important
to be enabled to access these good things.

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*Pages: 34-46 (Article)
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Title:
Attachment, Intellectual Disabilities and Mental Health: Research, Assessment and Intervention

Authors:
Schuengel, C; de Schipper, JC; Sterkenburg, PS; Kef, S

Source:
*JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES*, 26 (1):34-46; SI JAN 2013 

Abstract:
Background Attachment theory is highly influential in child and adult
mental health research and practice. Research and practice have started
now to explore the potential value of an attachment perspective for
understanding and alleviating the challenges that persons with
intellectual disabilities face in mental health and social
participation. Materials and Methods Research on attachment and
intellectual disabilities is reviewed on its importance for knowledge,
assessment and intervention. Results Progress was found in understanding
and distinguishing attachment behaviours, attachment relationships,
attachment representations, attachment styles and attachment disorders
and their respective implications for assessment and intervention.
Conclusions Of the various attachment-related concepts, insights into
attachment behaviours and relationships showed the most promise for
practical applications in the field of intellectual disabilities.
Findings on representations, styles and disorders were inconclusive or
preliminary. Attachment-informed research and practice can be part of
emerging developmental understanding of functioning with intellectual
disabilities.

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*Pages: 47-62 (Article)
*View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000312650600006
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Title:
Cognitive Behavioural Treatment for Anger in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Authors:
Nicoll, M; Beail, N; Saxon, D

Source:
*JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES*, 26 (1):47-62; SI JAN 2013 

Abstract:
Background The cognitive behavioural treatment for anger in adults with
intellectual disabilities has received increasing interest. The current
study aims to review the current literature and provide a meta-analysis.
Method A literature search found 12 studies eligible for the quality
appraisal. The studies examined cognitive behavioural treatment for
anger in adults with intellectual disabilities published since 1999.
Nine studies were eligible to be included in the meta-analysis. Results
The meta-analysis revealed large uncontrolled effect sizes for the
treatment for anger in adults with intellectual disabilities, but is
viewed with caution due to low sample sizes. The narrative review showed
improved methodological quality of the literature. Conclusions The
emerging literature is encouraging. However, it is limited through
concatenated data, a lack of comparative control groups and small study
samples.

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*Pages: 63-70 (Article)
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Title:
The Experiences of Staff Taking on the Role of Lay Therapist in a Group-Based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Anger Management Intervention for People with Intellectual Disabilities

Authors:
Stimpson, A; Kroese, BS; MacMahon, P; Rose, N; Townson, J; Felce, D;
Hood, K; Jahoda, A; Rose, J; Willner, P

Source:
*JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES*, 26 (1):63-70; SI JAN 2013 

Abstract:
Aim To explore the experience of lay therapists of a group-based
cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) anger management intervention.
Background Staff employed in daytime opportunity services for adults
with intellectual disabilities took on the role of lay therapist to
facilitate CBT groups.
Methods They were trained and supervised by clinical psychologists and
interviewed 26 weeks after the last group session. Their experiences
were explored by means of a qualitative approach, interpretative
phenomenological analysis (IPA).
Results Several key themes emerged from the interview data such as hopes
and fears, having a framework, making it work, observing progress,
ingredients of success, the therapist role and taking the group forward.
Conclusions These themes indicate that participants' experiences had
been perceived as positive for themselves, the service users as well as
the relevant organization although initially the therapist role had
appeared daunting.

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*Pages: 71-80 (Article)
*View Full Record: http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcAuth=Alerting&SrcApp=Alerting&DestApp=CCC&DestLinkType=FullRecord;KeyUT=CCC:000312650600008
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Title:
The Impact of Known Criminogenic Factors on Offenders with Intellectual Disability: Previous Findings and New Results on ADHD

Authors:
Lindsay, WR; Carson, D; Holland, AJ; Taylor, JL; O'Brien, G; Wheeler, JR

Source:
*JOURNAL OF APPLIED RESEARCH IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES*, 26 (1):71-80; SI JAN 2013 

Abstract:
Background Developmental and index offence variables have been
implicated strongly in later criminal behaviour and service pathways and
this paper investigated attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
which, with conduct disorder, has emerged from previous studies on
offenders. ADHD and conduct disorder are over-represented among criminal
populations when compared to the general population. The present authors
reviewed the extent to which ADHD affected the presentation of offenders
with intellectual disability. Method Information related to index
behaviour, history of problem behaviours, childhood adversity and
psychiatric diagnoses was recorded in 477 referrals to forensic
intellectual disability services. Comparisons were made between those
with a previous diagnosis of ADHD and those without. Results The ADHD
group showed higher proportions of physical aggression, substance use,
previous problems including aggression, sexual offences and property
offences, birth problems and abuse in childhood. Effect sizes were
small. Conclusion Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder with conduct
disorder is associated with a greater degree and history of problematic
behaviour in offenders with intellectual disability.

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